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How to Grow Garlic in Pots

How to Grow Garlic in Pots If you plan to make salsa from garlic, it is important to time your garlic to be ready to harvest at the same time as your other ingredients. Garlic from the grocery store is to home grown garlic what tomatoes from the grocery store are to home grown tomatoes: lacking flavor. Store garlic is bred for its storage ability and ease of harvesting qualities, but not for its flavor. Once you taste gourmet garlic fresh from your garden, you will want to always have it available. By selecting varieties to use fresh and varieties that store [ ... ]

How To Grow Salsa in Pots – Very Hot Peppers

How To Grow Salsa in Pots – Very Hot Peppers As a general rule, hotter peppers will do better in cooler climates. The heat of a pepper fruit is strongly influenced by its growing conditions, including humidity, and genetics. Some professional hot pepper growers use sulphur (sulfur) to condition the soil for hotter and healthier peppers. Sulfur is available at most drug stores, or you can simply place a spread out book of matches at the bottom of the pot or planting hole. When handling hot pepper pods to cook, wearing thick rubber glove is advised since the juices can soak [ ... ]

How to Grow Salsa in Pots — Heirloom Hot Peppers

How to Grow Salsa in Pots — Heirloom Hot Peppers Peppers are tropical plants, so they love heat and lots of moisture. Peppers are beautiful plants with shiny, dark green leaves. They are very ornamental with small, white flowers that are shaped like a street lantern, and displays of fruit in several stages of ripening all on the plant at the same time. Most stay small, so peppers can be grown in containers. For Tips, see How to Grow Peppers in Pots Heirloom Hot Peppers to Grow in Pots Pepperoncini Heirloom Peppers are a southern Italian variety that are served pickled as a [ ... ]

How to Grow Salsa in Pots – Heirloom Sweet Peppers

How to Grow Salsa in Pots – Heirloom Sweet Peppers For sweet salsa, most recipes call for red, yellow, or green peppers. Most recipes for hot salsa or medium salsa also have some type of sweet or green pepper as an ingredient. These heirloom sweet peppers have stood the test of time for their flavor and adaptability. California Wonder Heirloom Peppers were introduced in 1928 and were the largest open-pollinated bell pepper, at 3 inches by 4 inches. This pepper can be picked green, but will ripen to yellow, then red, getting sweeter at each stage. California Wonder peppers mature in about [ ... ]

How To Grow Salsa in Pots – Tomatoes

How To Grow Salsa in Pots – Tomatoes Arguably, no crop in the garden is more anticipated than the first fresh, vine ripened tomato of the season. Many hybrids have been bred to mature early, but tomato lovers often find these have little more flavor than do supermarket tomatoes. As a rule, bush or determinate tomatoes will do better in a container because the plants will tend to stay smaller. Most determinate tomatoes produce all of their fruit over a short period of time, such as within two weeks, and then stop producing. Determinate tomatoes are easier to grow since they do [ ... ]

How to Choose Which Tomatoes to Grow in Containers

Arguably, no crop in the garden is more anticipated than the first fresh, vine ripened tomato of the season. Many hybrids have been bred to mature early, but tomato lovers often find these have little more flavor than do supermarket tomatoes. As a rule, bush or determinate tomatoes will do better in a container because the plants will tend to stay smaller. Most determinate tomatoes produce all of their fruit over a short period of time, such as within two weeks, and then stop producing. Determinate tomatoes are easier to grow since they do not need as much pruning as indeterminate [ ... ]

How to Grow Salsa in Containers

Salsa is the most popular condiment in America, and a nutritious addition to any meal. By choosing the best varieties of vegetables to grow in pots, you can be making your own fresh salsa as early as July.  Once you grow your own salsa, you may never again eat salsa purchased from the store. Every  ingredient you grow will be of gourmet quality, and you will be able to blend your new favorite varieties of vegetables and herbs for the best tasting salsa. Picante sauce or salsa can be made out of anything you like, including fruit. Mexican salsa is often [ ... ]

How to Grow Vegetables in Pots

How to Grow Vegetables in Pots Growing vegetables in containers can be one of the most rewarding gardening projects you can explore. Almost anything can be grown in a container, given that you supply the container with everything that your plants need. Once you discover how easy container gardening is, you will want to try growing everything that you like to eat in a container. Growing plants is as much an art as it is a science, so by all means, do not ever get discouraged if you kill a plant or even many plants. And growing plants inside can be even [ ... ]

How to Plant Early Season Vegetables

To get a crop out of your garden quickly, choose some fast-maturing vegetables. For vegetables that are normally transplanted, such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants, the maturity date stated on the plant tag is the number of days after the plant is set out until harvest. For seeds, it is the number of days from planting the seeds to harvest, which is normally stated on the packet. Be sure to label your plantings. Popsicle sticks written on with pencil are the most economical plant labels and stay readable the longest.   How to Plant Early Season Vegetables: Early Season Lettuce Cultivars Fresh lettuce [ ... ]

How to Grow Lettuce Inside

You can grow lettuce inside in containers for a fresh supply of salads all winter long. Put containers in your sunniest south- or southeast-facing window. If this is not possible, use grow lights made out of inexpensive shop lights that hold several florescent bulbs. Using half cool light bulbs and half light warm light bulbs will provide your plants with the widest spectrum of light possible. Grow lights should be a few inches above the top of the plants, and be moved up as the plants grow. Leave lights on for at least 12 hours a day, but up to [ ... ]